Let’s talk Guitars!


#21

Yeah I see your point… It would just be nice to see some craftsmanship instead of machined or stamped stuff, you know… But I guess in this day and age your right… It’s a shame really


#22

Much, much, better topic! Heaven Gifts is boring. SOS. This is much more interesting!!


#23

I used to be master derailer in the past. I guess title rightfully belongs to someone else now :smiley:


#24

No idea who changed the title, but I like it.


#25

I did it. It was obvious in which direction this conversation is going, and I definitely like that particular direction :smiley:


#26

I got my start in an entirely different era and to be honest I know that it would be much harder now. I took in apprentices and none of them have been able to sustain themselves after going out on their own. CNC machining along with massive advertising creatures and budgets have made the art near extinct.

Adary watched a proper finish applied to a handcrafted instrument and it does take a lot of labor time. Whereas the ‘cookie cutter’ cnc stuff has a catalyzed polyester finish applied in minutes and cured under UV in seconds rather than weeks. Other aspects are the same. No way is the polyester finish as good and it is impossible to repair where the solvent based finishes (a) are easily repaired if you know what you are doing and (b) are vastly superior for a long list of reasons. There are many others.

I trained with a Canadian Luthier in Saskatchewan who taught me invaluable things.


#27

I strongly believe that CNC has it’s place in guitar manufacture, especially when you are making solid wood instruments. They can spare a lot of time with rough cutting, shaping, sanding, not to mention precision cutting of fret slots.

But there is a limit to what they can do, and the best instruments will be always hand finished, hand painted (with properly nitro cellulose lacquer in extremely thin coats), frets will be manually pushed it, leveled, crowned, and the instrument will be manually set up to perfection.

This can work to an extent with acoustic instruments, but only for cutting out necks and perhaps giving a rough shape to top and back plates. The rest is the proper art :slight_smile:


#28

I myself made an overhead pin router that I used for several purposes but particularly works well with solid body electrics. Excepting Telecaster style chambered bodies, I very rarely cloned anything and simply told people that if you want brand “x” then they should buy one. Got some incredulous looks. Basically anything I was going to do more than once had some sort of jig or fixture. Everything but violins were nitro finished. But I agree, cnc does have a place but it will never replace hands on things too numerous to list.

I lost count of how many have hung their heads after visiting the Martin factory expecting to see old men like me with a draw-knife in hand carving a neck or something. Busts their bubble and they all say the same…its fully automated LOL. No shit.


#29

That’s probably why there isn’t a single good martin manufactured after early 70’s :smiley:


#30

Here’s an interesting hunk o wood. For those that may not know instrument woods are sawn in consecutive sets where a mirror image “bookmatch” grain is achieved. I was thicknessing this set of Oregon Myrtle which I honestly did not think much of and looked at the bookmatch grain. ET appeared…

And a hollow Tele made from the figured Redwood for the same customer with the first pictured.


#31

That PRS styled guitar next to the tele tho :slight_smile:

I never lied the shape of telecasters but that second guitar is gorgeous :slight_smile:


#32

I need to win the lottery so I can have enough money to get @mrpipes to come out of retirement and build me a custom bass :slight_smile: Wondering what instruments everyone here plays and of course lets see some pics please!


#33

None of mine are pretty and I don’t even have any pictures. They’re all work horses. A couple are retired, an old Music Man Stingray and a real old Peavey. The three I use are a Warwick Thumb bolt on, a Schecter fretless, and NS NXT EUB. Wait… I lied. I have this pic where I grabbed the Peavey for the pic.

Oh crap, and this one with the EUB…


#34

How do you like the Stingray? I came real close to buying one a few times. I like the Leo Fender story, but not necessarily the Fender designs or feel.


#35

It has it’s place. Unfortunately a place I no longer am part of. I played it for about a dozen years with a 17 piece big band. Strung it up with some fairly light flats. It fingers pretty good and by rolling the strings I could get a fairly convincing period sound. Tonal variety is limited regarding the pick-ups and pre-amp. Well balanced.


#36

Here are my babies. Standing from left to right; Electra Anniversary Edition circa 1981, 1965 Vox Cougar, BC Rich Warlock, BC Rich Ironbird, Aria Pro II ZZB Custom, Vantage acoustic electric 6 string.
On the floor; BC Rich Mockingbird and Vantage 6 string. I love playing bass, I am not a 6 string player, but need them to compose. My big fingers fumble around on those tiny strings.


#37

I never cared much for guitar. Pretty weird now that I’m in a band that is just guitar, keys, bass, and drums. Our guitar player is exceptional and can really make some wonderful sounds. I’ve always been bass. I started out on the upright. Transitioning to a bass guitar was pretty strange for me. Big mental block there. Finely made peace with the thing and all was well.


#38

I grew up in Kalamazoo. Everyone knew somebody that worked at Gibson. They weren’t really known for their basses and I didn’t really care for them although I would love to have a Thunderbird and Les Paul Bass. It was almost like sacrilege if you didn’t buy Gibson. But I am not about convention and you can see I like different styles of basses. Our house was about 1/2 mile from Bigsby, the vibrato, tremolo maker. I didn’t even realize what they made until I was a teenager. We also had ProCo cables and GHS strings nearby.

There was always just something about bass with me. The thunder and vibration and the punch in your chest. That round bouncy groove sound or that feeling when you connect with a drummer that gets you and it all clicks.


#39

Very nice guys. Sparks has G.A.S. so we’re waiting to see some of that gear, particularly some of his amps and effects. I think Eddie has guitars. Adary likely has a room full. Who else?


#40

I have a dog whistle but you can’t hear it which is for the best as I have the musical ability of a rock.